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Land Use Planning and Socio Economic Issues in Phonesay and Nam Mo Districts.  

Land Use Planning and Socio Economic Issues in Phonesay and Nam Mo Districts.

Re-location and consolidation of villages is a very important strategy of District Authorities and to facilitate easier provision of services to larger village units located near roads.[<br> The authorities have very clear plans regarding the number of villages that will be re-located or consolidated, however they lack resources to properly prepare for re-locating or consolidating villages, or to provide the support necessary to complete the plans effectively or adequately. <br> Land use difficulties are arising as a consequence of this incapacity to plan and support the villagers being consolidated. These problems include inequities between villagers to access agricultural land, inadequate land for sustainable agriculture, social incompatibility between villagers being merged, and inadequate land use planning practices when implementing the plans. <br> There have been voluntary or spontaneous migrations by villagers for several years from more isolated areas to areas close to roads which offer possibilities for improved services and potential to improve livelihoods. Villager ambitions are therefore fairly compatible with the thinking and plans of the District Authorities, as they too have indicated their desire to live in less isolated areas. <br> It is not clear if District Authorities would provide guarantees that village management areas and village boundaries in the re-location areas can be expanded to ensure adequate land is available for agricultural production for the increasing population. This requires further follow-up. <br> Villager communities often migrate gradually, with a few families moving to the new location first, after which others follow. Families from more than one village often move to the one location. <br> Villagers of Hmong ethnic origins are the group mostly affected by re-location and consolidation programmes. Not all villagers wish to migrate, some preferring to remain in their home village<br> Villagers while wanting to access land near roads or planned roads, have strategies for retaining access to land in their home village areas, some distance from the road, to give them adequate land and also better land use options, eg, cattle raising, rain-fed crop production. Villagers are prepared to contribute to the improvement of access tracks to these areas to make transportation of produce more convenient. <br> The District proposals include the planting of introduced crops that are not or may not yet be climatically or market proven, ie coffee, head cabbages. The villagers, on the other hand, are considering crops and livestock options with which they are familiar (lower risk). Villagers are more concerned with organising land use zoning so that they can put these land use options into practice. <br>] The land use planning and land allocation programs are largely undertaken in response to the GOL policies and plans for shifting cultivation and opium reduction. Re-location and consolidation of villages are key strategies to effect these policies. These two programs are managed by different agencies in the District, re-location by the District Administration and LUP/LA by the DAFO. Using LUP/LA to provide for villager livelihood improvement and land use security appears to be a secondary consideration and subservient to relocation ambitions.

Published by: National Agriculture and Forestry Research Institute (NAFRI) -
Uploaded on: Jun 2006
File size: 322 KB - Language: English
Keyword(s): Natural Resources Management
Category: Environment

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